Do kids in greener neighborhoods grow up with bigger brains?

This is so far out of my area of expertise that I have no way of evaluating methodology or results, except to point out that it’s worth thinking about the water policy implications:

The Association between Lifelong Greenspace Exposure and 3-Dimensional Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Barcelona Schoolchildren

Lifelong exposure to greenness was positively associated with gray matter volume in the left and right prefrontal cortex and in the left premotor cortex and with white matter volume in the right prefrontal region, in the left premotor region, and in both cerebellar hemispheres. Some of these regions partly overlapped with regions associated with cognitive test scores (prefrontal cortex and cerebellar and premotor white matter), and peak volumes in these regions predicted better working memory and reduced inattentiveness.

It is at the very least another reminder that my longstanding enthusiasm for water “conservation” may be missing things.

Dadvand, Payam, et al. “The Association between Lifelong Greenspace Exposure and 3-Dimensional Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Barcelona Schoolchildren.” Environmental Health Perspectives 27012: 1.

2 Comments

  1. I assume when they speak of “greenness “ they are referring to natural areas/openspace/parks, etc. Rather than the color green. By that I mean grass, trees, green plants, which defines the outdoors, open space, natural areas in many parts of the world but not all. Many parts of the Southwest for instance. Maybe a minor point but could cause confusion to many readers. The same is the case with “green” technology rather than sustainable technology.

  2. Kinda interesting but they’re week on the obvious alternative: greener = richer; and richer is likely to lead to better brains from all kinds of factors starting with nutrition.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *